About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
-school in dallas or houston, we want to be able to admit that students. the university of texas is saying we want to consider race sometimes and that is what the dispute is about. the critics say, no, it is wrong to consider race and you don't need to do it in this case. you've got a reasonable amount of racial diversity. host: let's turn to another case -- as you enter that, i will show that had line from "the wall street journal." answer to't know the that question. i think it would be unlikely, however. justice scalia is 76 and justice kennedy is 76. they are both generally on the right side of the court. justice ruth better ginsburg will be 80 in the spring. she is the oldest of the justices on the liberal side. if you had to guess who was going to leave in the next four years, i think the standard guess would be justice ginsburg. it was very important for the ideological makeup of the court whether barack obama or mitt romney is president of united states because it justice ginsburg had left and another conservative justice came in, that could have changed the balance of the court. if, in th
states in every state including texas. this is a vibrant place in dallas. people are moving here in droves. we have an honest to goodness fair government. thank you very much. guest: thank you for your kind words about me. taxes is growing by leaps and bounds. this is made our country much more energy independent and has brought the price of natural gas down. i hope we can agree we don't want to reverse that and continue to go forward with these wonderful changes that have taken place in energy. we have a chance to see a renaissance in manufacturing. a lot of these jobs going overseas may come home. i have been asked and i would make three quick points. i think this election was about a lot of things. i think it is more complicated than that. i would start with the candidates. mitt romney is a good man. he wasn't as natural a communicator as the president . he had a habit of saying things that didn't help him. the president is a natural and gifted communicator. the democrats had a much better get out the vote operation. republicans need to focus on that. democrats were better in
and their recovery. let's go to james in dallas, texas. caller: good morning. the answer to your question. it is very difficult to have a lot of confidence in the security team regardless of what happened in benghazi. the president could have come out and given the public the truth. a lot of callers will call in and say people do not like barack obama because of his skin color. i voted for barack obama in 2000 because of his skin color. i wanted this country to get passed a landmark issue of electing a african-american for president. one of your earlier callers mentioned the daywear the target. i see no reason why this administration did not take action. if they did not take action because they did not know what was happening, i think there is evidence they did know what was happening, it is unforgivable. if they did not know what was going on, that is even more inexcusable. host: manhattan, kansas. dave is an independent caller. caller: i just wanted to say the foreign policy of obama is a spitting image of bush. we have droned more pakistan as than bush under obama. it is only creating more terrori
in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday. >> "washington journal" continues. host: and as law makers return to the lame discussion legislative session, congress and the white house are beginning negotiations today on how to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff to discuss this issue. we're joined by wisconsin republican senator ron johnson. senator johnson, we've now heard president obama repeatedly insist that any deal that's reached has to include higher taxes on the wealthiest americans. is that something you see republicans being able to agree to? guest: i think republicans are all about increasing revenue of the federal combovement. but our concept is let's increase revenue the old fashioned way by growing our economy because it's far more effective. if we increase marginal tax rates on higher income individuals, you really are beginning to tax smaller, medium sized businesses. i had one of those businesses for 31 years. i understand how it is. if you your marginal tack rates are 40%, which is kind of where it is today. you've got 60 cents of every dollar available to reinvest
that is 5% unemployment. dallas county where i live, it's pretty high. a lot of people moving out of buffalo, out of the county. they have debunked that. i heard something on the newshour, pbs, that was interesting. it was just a statement, but the mormons and the muslims are teaming up to work for charity. i hope that's true. now the election is over. evidently, enough republicans like obama that he's back in there. as far as lindsey graham, i don't know why the tea party is trying to get rid of him. he bashes obama constantly. i have two tv sets on to watch them. the election is over. if you have got a problem, get to your representative or senator and ask him to do the business of the people. they work for us. but when they get elected and they think they are our boss. host: we will be talking about getting to work, coming up next, in the fiscal cliff talks. i first want to let you know that first lady michelle obama will be presented with the official white house christmas tree today. it is a 19-foot fur from jefferson, south carolina that this month.ed they have been presenting the offi
-mail or allowing people to vote in districts where they do not live, provisional bots. -- dallas. -- provisional ballots. i do not know that it is more democrats than republicans. i suppose, it could drive down the popular vote for obama nationally, but i don't know that it will necessarily do that in any of the states that were hit. host: kristie from tennessee. caller: we all know as americans, whether we are democratic or republican to run a health care reform is very important. i am a political science major at my state college. i know a little bit about the dynamics of how politics works on an elementary level. you say in your article that obama and the next four years would be willing to cut deals with republicans, possibly. why if he was elected in 2008, why didn't you listen to the voices in congress on the republican side, and why did he pushed through a health care reform act that all of us as americans feel so strongly about? it would have been so nice if he had chosen by partition chip -- bipartisanship then and we would not be in a stalemate. of americans, a lot do like obamacare. i
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
am retired, but i was a plant worker. host: where is marshalled? caller: 150 miles east of dallas. host: thank you for calling. as greta mentioned, the same-sex marriage issue passed in the state of maryland, and along with that the first openly gay member of the u.s. senate was elected in wisconsin. here is tammy baldwin. [video clip] >> i did not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. [applause] a difference in the lives of families struggling to find work and pay the bills, a difference in the lives of students worried about debt. [applause] and seniors, worried about their retirement security. [applause] a difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them and their families. [applause] a difference in the lives of entrepreneur weres -- entrepreneurs try to build a business and economic security. [applause] but in choosing me to tackle those challenges, the people of wisconsin have made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his
in dallas? 30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> truman got into politics after having failed that many businesses as a young man. the only way to get into politics in the missouri was to be part of a machine. he looked up with the pending breast machine, which was the most corrupt and often -- tender grass machine which was the most corrupt and often vicious. the second is what we all know about, how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story behind the atomic bomb before he became president, and then when the decision was on his desk? it is still a controversial story, i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, aida donald looks up the life of harry truman sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c-span's "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy h
' american history tv, 30 years later the questions remain. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy today at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> truman had two big puzzles in his life. the first was, this was a man who got into politics having failed at many businesses as a young man. the only way to get into politics in missouri was to be part of a machine. there were two machines. he hooked up with the pendergast machine, which was the most corrupt and often vicious machine. i said to myself, how did this happen? how could he possibly work in this machine in local politics? that was the first thing i had to work out. the second is what we all know about. how does he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story about the atomic bomb before he became president and then when the decision was on his desk? it is still a controversial story. i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, a look at the early life of president truman tonight at 8 p.m. on c-span's "q & a." host: joining us from new york is jus
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10